Konrad Hinsen's Blog

Posts tagged reproducible research

Is reproducibility good for scientific progress? (a paper review)

A few days ago, a discussion in my Twitter timeline caught my attention. It was about a very high-level model for the process of scientific research whose conclusions included the affirmation that reproducibility does not improve the convergence of the research process towards truth. The Twitter discussion set off some alarm bells for me, in particular the use of the term “reproducibility” in the abstract, without specifying which of its many interpretations and application contexts everybody referred. But that’s just the Twitter discussion, let’s turn to the more relevant question of what to think of the paper itself (preprint on arXiv).

Reproducible research in the Python ecosystem: a reality check

A few years ago, I decided to adopt the practices of reproducible research as far as possible within the technical and social constraints I have to live with. So how reproducible is my published code over time?

Reproducibility does not imply reproduction

In discussions about computational reproducibility (or replicability, or repeatability, according to the preference of each author), I often see the argument that reproducing computations may not be worth the investment in terms of human effort and computational resources. I think this argument misses the point of computational reproducibility.

Sustainable software and reproducible research: dealing with software collapse

Two currently much discussed issues in scientific computing are the sustainability of research software and the reproducibility of computer-aided research. I believe that the communities behind these two ideals should work together on taming their common enemy: software collapse. As a starting point, I propose an analysis of how the risk of collapse affects sustainability and reproducibility.

From reproducible to verifiable computer-aided research

The importance of reproducibility in computer-aided research (and elsewhere) is by now widely recognized in the scientific community. Of course, a lot of work remains to be done before reproducibility can be considered the default. Doing computational research reproducibly must become easier, which requires in particular better support in computational tools. Incentives for working and publishing reproducibly must also be improved. But I believe that the Reproducible Research movement has made enough progress that it’s worth considering the next step towards doing trustworthy research with the help of computers: verifiable research.